Backcountry Time and Distance

Fire starting, Water and Camp site locations

Re: Backcountry Time and Distance

Postby kevin_t » Mon Dec 12, 2016 4:51 pm

So it seems to be the trend is ..

-- You can do a lot more than you think in a day for a day or two
-- You can train up to more in a day over a couple months
-- Marines are tough :)
-- You can train prior and it can help
-- Have fun hike your own hike
-- There is a certain weight .. where speed seems to get impacted. I would generally argue same is true for terrain etc
-- Stacking huge days .. will only work for a couple days

In the end .. know your capabilities. If you want more then train for them as close to possible, or plan to work up to them if taking the "long" view.
And .. enjoy it . Try to avoid making it work as much as possible . Training can help increase distance and speed covered if that is the goal.
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Re: Backcountry Time and Distance

Postby MontanaMarine » Mon Dec 12, 2016 9:11 pm

I agree on knowing your own capabilities/limitations, and push yourself accordingly.

Another thing I'll add is how pushing to overload, repeatedly, when your body is not properly toughened up, can lead to injuries nobody needs out on the hill.

Bad blisters, tendonitis, I saw one young Marine pop his Achilles off his heelbone. Any of those kind of injuries are a major buzzkill, and can even put one in danger if remote and alone.

I know it's preaching to the choir to those who are out there a lot, just kind of thinking out loud.


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Re: Backcountry Time and Distance

Postby ktimm » Mon Dec 12, 2016 9:45 pm

MontanaMarine wrote:I agree on knowing your own capabilities/limitations, and push yourself accordingly.

Another thing I'll add is how pushing to overload, repeatedly, when your body is not properly toughened up, can lead to injuries nobody needs out on the hill.

Bad blisters, tendonitis, I saw one young Marine pop his Achilles off his heelbone. Any of those kind of injuries are a major buzzkill, and can even put one in danger if remote and alone.

I know it's preaching to the choir to those who are out there a lot, just kind of thinking out loud.


Shane


Agreed one hundred percent on pushing too hard ... thus the long view. For me , I can go out a couple days and push pretty hard and then relax . However , if I haven't done big days recently and I'm planning for a few days I'll take the long view and ease into it over a couple days. For hunting ... I always take the long view because with elk the packout is usually the couple day push ( if I'm lucky enough for that )


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Re: Backcountry Time and Distance

Postby ktimm » Mon Dec 12, 2016 9:47 pm

Plus ... some people haven't experienced this but elk hunting is just different . They are so big ... and such a workload once down ... that you really have to be cognizant of your abilities or ability to get help


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Re: Backcountry Time and Distance

Postby Camber » Tue Dec 13, 2016 7:31 am

You guys pretty much beat me to the only thing I was going to add...and that's the mental game. Not just dealing with discomfort but being able to really assess things. You have to be ready to push yourself to some discomfort, but also have practiced enough to have an idea when trying new things.

We are planning a trip out west, and I know I'll have to be careful about the way I plan the day hikes, because even if I can handle the mileage, the elevation and altitude (oxygen levels) will definitely be different and add to the difficulty. And as Kevin noted, I don't want the trip to turn into Marine training ;). I want it to be enjoyable.

It's funny too you mention the elk. My brother in law and his best friend (also a friend of mine) are planning a Montana elk hunting trip for next September, and I don't think either has done more than a couple of miles with a 40lb pack. I will be curious to see how bad a packout affects them if they get anything.
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